Posts Tagged ‘Day Skipper Theory’

This little blog is simply to act as a reminder for symbols you may commonly see on weather charts. As we know weather forecasting is not an exact science but a science it is, the information given below is a very simple summary of the common symbols used with the typical weather associated.

warm front

Warm Front – This symbol depicts the leading edge of a warmer air mass. The air ahead of this front will be cooler than the air behind it. Typical weather ahead of the warm front will be fine then heavier rain, as the warm front passes the rain will stop and become drizzle in the warm sector.


Cold Front

Cold Front – This symbol depicts the leading edge of a colder air mass. The air ahead of this front will be warmer than the air behind it. Typical weather just before and at the front itself will be heavy rain, hail, thunder, lightning, behind the front there will be sunny periods with scattered showers.


Occluded FrontOccluded Front – An occluded front is formed when the cold front catches up the warm front, the symbol combines the shapes of the warm and the cold front. Typically underneath an occluded front there will be rain as the warm air is being pushed aloft and condenses.


Frontal System Northern Hemisphere

Frontal System – This diagram shows a frontal system and the relationship between the fronts described above. This is a typical frontal system in the Northern Hemisphere and can be seen on good quality weather forecasts on television. The system is formed around an area of low pressure which will circulate in an anti-clockwise direction. This example already shows an occluded front where the cold front has already caught up with the warm front, the cold air in front of the warm front and behind the cold front with the area of warm air being squeezed in between.


Stationary FrontStationary Front – A stationary front is a boundary between two air masses neither of which is strong enough to replace the other. Cloud and rain are usually associated with a stationary front.


Developing Warm FrontDeveloping Cold Front Developing Warm / Cold Front (Frontogenesis) – This symbol depicts the formation or intensification of a meteorological front caused by the difference in temperature of adjacent air masses. No significant weather associated.


Weakening Warm FrontWeakening Cold Front Weakening Warm / Cold Front (Frontolysis) – This symbol represents a front which is loosing its identity usually due to rising pressure and where air masses are diverging. Cloud and precipitation becomes increasingly fragmented.


High and Low Pressure Isobars

High & Low Pressure Systems – This diagram depicts pressure systems in the Northern hemisphere, the arrows are showing us the wind direction, the wind moves anti-clockwise around an area of low pressure and clockwise around an area of high pressure. You will also note that the arrows around the low pressure are pointing slightly inwards toward the centre this is due to the wind converging around an area of low pressure, the opposite is true of high pressure, the wind diverges and therefore points slightly away from the centre.


Geostrophic wind scale

Surface Pressure Chart – This surface pressure charts shows areas of high and low pressure depicted by the H and the L on the chart. You can also see lines all over the chart which are called isobars, these connect areas of the same pressure, some of these lines have numbers on them which is giving you the pressure at that particular isobar. Isobars are like contour lines on an ordnance survey map, the closer they are together the steeper the hill, with isobars the closer they are together the stronger the wind. With this type of chart you can actually measure the wind speed by measuring the space between the isobars and using the scale in the top left hand corner.


Wind Strength symbols

Wind symbols – If you use grib files or sites like Passage Weather you will see lines such as the ones on the left here showing you the wind direction and the wind speed in the area you are looking at. Wind is always described in relation to the direction it is coming from, in the UK our prevailing wind and weather comes from the South West and in wind terms would be described as a South Westerly. On the bars on the left there are a number of different lines or barbs, the short lines represent 5 knots and the long lines 10 knots of wind. You can now see combinations of these making up 15, 20, 25 etc until you reach the triangular shape which represents 50 knots. These lines will always be on the back of the arrow and this is where the wind is coming from so in all the examples on the diagram the wind is coming from the north east.


If you found this blog useful please let us know and if there are any specific topics you would like us to cover in future blogs, again please let us know, you can contact us directly at info@nomadsailing.co.uk

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Have you ever thought about a holiday with a difference ? How about a holiday where you can visit a different place every day but you only have to unpack once and still have all your gear with you. Where you can wake up, take a few steps from where you have been sleeping and dive into crystal clear waters with no one else around.
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Your mode of transport harnesses the wind and is therefore a very environmentally friendly way to spend 7 – 14 days travelling to different places of stunning beauty and it’s up to you where you go, when you go and how long you stay.

Your destination are up to you, the distance you travel each day is up to you, you may like somewhere so much you stay for a couple of days and in many parts of Europe that staying will cost you nothing. I could continue and add hundreds of photos from numerous locations but that might get a bit tedious. What I can say however is that undertaking one theory and two practical courses (with a bit of sailing in between) will enable you to start exploring the world from a totally new perspective. If you fancy that read on or give us a call on 07917 573 772 / 07913 940 277 / 01424 461185

First off you would need to get some sailing experience under your belt, the Competent Crew Course is a great way of doing this and learning how to do things correctly from the start f your sailing career, this is a 5 day course and can be done over 5 consecutive days or be split over two weekends on of which will incorporate a Monday or Friday, you will cover the following;

  • Preparation for sea
  • Knowledge of sea terms and parts of a boat, her rigging and sails
  • Sail handling
  • Ropework and knots
  • Fire precautions, personal safety equipment
  • Man Overboard and emergency equipment
  • Helmsmanship
  • Keeping Lookout
  • Use of dinghies
  • General Duties
  • Manner and Customs
  • Night Sailing

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 After completing this course your next step is to do the Day Skipper Theory, this course can be done as an evening class one night a week for seven weeks followed by a final weekend where revision and the exams are undertaken. This is a great way to met like minded people trying to achieve the same goals as you. Alternatively, if attending an evening class is not convenient for you to attend evening classes you can complete this course on-line in your own time, we are always available via email or telephone to help you with the course, you can go at your own speed and take the exam in the comfort of your own home. The Day Skipper Theory Course covers the following;

  • the basics of seamanship
  • the essentials of coastal navigation and pilotage
  • chartwork
  • electronic charts
  • position fixing
  • plotting a course to steer
  • weather forecasting and meteorology
  • tides
  • collision regulations
  • construction, parts and equipment of a cruising boat
  • emergency and safety procedures including distress calls, use of flares, safety harnesses, lifejackets and liferafts

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Now the final push to give you that ticket to freedom, the Day Skipper Practical course, this is a five day course and can be done again over five consecutive days or over a split weekend. Here I have to say I have quite a strong opinion that says do the five consecutive, this I believe is far better value for money and much better from a continuity point of view. Either way I would also say do this qualification in the UK and even go so far as to say do it in the Solent, this is such a busy shipping area, popular cruising area and for some reason requires 3 ferry routes, 2 fast cat routes and a hover craft to carry the thousands of people who travel to and from the Isle of Wight on a daily basis. So you will see all manner of craft including huge cruise and cargo ships as well as numerous sailing and power driven vessels. Not only this, you have just spent 7 weeks, one evening a week in a classroom getting to grips with tides, both heights and streams, you have just learned all your International Regulations for the Prevention of Collision at Sea (IRPCS), all you lights, buoys and shapes, you may as well experience it and experience it you will in the lovely protected waters of the Solent !!

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Why leave it any longer come on, do something different today that could affect the rest of your life !!!